Rochner Films

Cinematography Production & Timelapse

Erik works with National Geographic on Colorado River Delta series

nat-geo

The Colorado River Delta once boasted a million acres of lush cattail marshes and riverside forests of cottonwoods and willows. But today, due to dams and diversions upstream, the river rarely flows through its delta anymore, and only ten percent of that verdant landscape remains.Colorado River delta series

But now, with the recent signing of a bi-national agreement to give some flow back to the delta, along with two decades of hard work by scientists, conservation organizations, and local communities, the groundwork has been laid for a comeback.

Invasive salt cedar is being removed and native cottonwoods and willows planted in their place. A treatment plant for Mexicali’s wastewater now includes an adjacent 250-acre wetland that further treats the water and provides crucial habitat for birds and wildlife. Irrigation improvements are conserving water. And local farmers are voluntarily selling their water rights to the recently created Colorado River Delta Water Trust, which then returns that water to the delta environment.

The surprising formation some thirty years ago of La Ciénega de Santa Clara– the “accidental wetland” – from the release of farm drainage into the dry delta revealed a startling fact: just add water and life returns.

Check out the series here